I. Stephen Brown, DDS
(215) 735-3660

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Archive for April, 2013

The Different Types of Periodontal Disease in Children

Wednesday, April 17th, 2013

Hormonal changes related to puberty can put teens at greater risk for getting periodontal disease. During puberty, an increased level of hormones, such as progesterone and possibly estrogen, cause increased blood circulation to the gums. This may cause an increase in the gum’s sensitivity and lead to a greater reaction to any irritation, including food particles and plaque. During this time, the gums may become swollen, turn red and feel tender.

As a teen progresses through puberty, the tendency for the gums to swell in response to irritants will lessen. However, during puberty, it is very important to follow a good at-home dental hygiene regimen, including regular brushing and flossing, and regular dental care. In some cases, a dental professional may recommend periodontal therapy to help prevent damage to the tissues and bone surrounding the teeth.

3 Different Types of Periodontal Disease that Commonly Affect Children

Chronic gingivitis is common in children. It usually causes gum tissue to swell, turn red and bleed easily. Gingivitis is both preventable and treatable with a regular routine of brushing, flossing and professional dental care. However, left untreated, it can eventually advance to more serious forms of periodontal disease.

Aggressive periodontitis can affect young people who are otherwise healthy. Localized aggressive periodontitis is found in teenagers and young adults and mainly affects the first molars and incisors. It is characterized by the severe loss of alveolar bone, and ironically, patients generally form very little dental plaque or calculus.

Generalized aggressive periodontitis may begin around puberty and involve the entire mouth. It is marked by inflammation of the gums and heavy accumulations of plaque and calculus. Eventually it can cause the teeth to become loose.

To learn more about periodontal disease, or to set up an evaluation for your child today, please contact our Philadelphia dental office.

The Risk Factors of Gum Disease

Friday, April 12th, 2013

Gum disease is the leading cause of adult tooth loss. Fortunately, there are many factors that contribute to gum disease which we can control. In the ongoing fight against gum disease and for the protection of your overall health it is incredibly important to be aware of the following contributors to gum disease.

Clenching or Grinding Your Teeth

Clenching or grinding your teeth can put excess force on the supporting tissues of the teeth and could speed up the rate at which these periodontal tissues are destroyed.

Poor Nutrition and Obesity

A diet low in important nutrients can compromise the body’s immune system and make it harder for the body to fight off infection. Because periodontal disease begins as an infection, poor nutrition can worsen the condition of your gums. In addition, research has shown that obesity may increase the risk of periodontal disease.

Genetics

Research has indicated that some people may be genetically susceptible to gum disease. Despite aggressive oral care habits, these people may be more likely to develop periodontal disease. Identifying these people with a genetic test before they even show signs of the disease and getting them into early intervention treatment may help them keep their teeth for a lifetime.

Stress

Stress is linked to many serious conditions such as hypertension, cancer, and numerous other health problems. Stress also is a risk factor for periodontal disease. Research demonstrates that stress can make it more difficult for the body to fight off infection, including periodontal diseases.

Age

Studies indicate that older people have the highest rates of periodontal disease. Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention indicates that over 70% of Americans 65 and older have periodontists.

Smoking/Tobacco Use

Tobacco use is linked with many serious illnesses such as cancer, lung disease and heart disease, as well as numerous other health problems. Tobacco users also are at increased risk for periodontal disease. Studies have shown that tobacco use may be one of the most significant risk factors in the development and progression of periodontal disease.

Medications

Some drugs, such as oral contraceptives, anti-depressants, and certain heart medicines, can affect your oral health. Just as you notify your pharmacist and other health care providers of all medicines you are taking and any changes in your overall health, you should also inform your dental care provider.

Other Systemic Diseases

Other systemic diseases that interfere with the body’s inflammatory system may worsen the condition of the gums. These include cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis.

 

Infection Control – Your Safety is Our Concern!

Wednesday, April 3rd, 2013

As you are probably aware, there is widespread news coverage involving the investigation of an Oklahoma oral surgeon for allegedly poor infection control practices.

I want you to assure you that in my periodontal and dental implant practice, we have in place significant infection control procedures.

– All staff are trained beyond state regulations, and undergo continuous infection control education and certification. We utilize hand washing, single use gloves, masks, eye ware, and gowns as necessary.

– We try to utilize disposable items, and after being used, they are placed in special containers for monitored disposal.

– Surgical instruments are cleaned and sterilized with a steam autoclave under heat and pressure. All items are bagged with chemical indicators and the autoclave is regularly spore tested to verify it is working correctly.

– We use sterile water and water that is distilled and treated on site. We also utilize water testing to check the water lines in the dental units.

– Before you enter the room and sit in the dental chair, all surfaces (dental chair, tray, dental light, handles, countertops care cleaned, disinfected, and plastic covers are placed as appropriate.

– Your well-being is the priority of my staff and me.

If you have any questions please call me at your earliest convenience so I can get you an answer.

Sincerely,

I. Stephen Brown, DDS, FACD, FICD